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New and Updated Call for Papers, Panels, and Roundtables


Sixth Global International Studies Conference
The ‘International’ Around the World: Multiple Voices, Alternative Orders
Buenos Aires, Argentina
29 June – 1 July, 2022
Venue: Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina (UCA)


The World International Studies Committee invites additional submissions of individual paper, panel, and roundtable proposals for its Sixth Global International Studies Conference. If you already made your submission in 2019 and it has been accepted, you do not need to resubmit it. Your Section Chairs will contact you within the next month to confirm your participation in the Program.

To check your previously submitted proposal, please click the button below and log into your ConfTool account:


New and Updated Call for Papers, Panels, and Roundtables

Based on the vibrant scholarship of the WISC community, our 2022 Program is organized around thirty Thematic Sections and one Conference Theme Section (“The ‘International’ Around the World: Multiple Voices, Alternative Orders”). The goal of the sections is to encourage the formation of networks for future collaboration based on individual and collective research agendas.

You can submit your new proposal(s) to up to two sections, ranked in order of preference (first and second choice). Please indicate clearly which two sections should consider your proposal. Proposals should be submitted only in English, even though the language of the paper, panel or roundtable may be Spanish/Portuguese.

Before making your submission, please review the whole list of sections, as your proposal may be relevant to sections that might not appear close together in the list below. Section Chairs and the Program Committee will consider your submission.

Each submission should include title, and the author’s name, position, email address, and academic affiliation.

For new participants, please click the button below to register and proceed with the submission of your proposal.
 


Types of proposals

Individual paper proposals: In addition to the details mentioned above, these submissions should include a 250-word abstract and the language of the presentation.

Panel proposals: A paper panel consists of four or five papers, a Discussant and a Chair. Proposals must include an abstract of the panel of up to 250 words, abstracts of each individual paper, and name, affiliation and other details of paper authors and Chair and Discussant as indicated above. Please note that each panel should run either entirely in English or entirely in Spanish/Portuguese, which may be combined. Panels may not combine English with any other language. Please indicate the language(s) of the panel.

Roundtable proposals: A roundtable consists of up to eight participants in total, including the Chair. Proposals must include an abstract of up to 250 words indicating the theme and main questions to be addressed in the roundtable, as well as a list of confirmed participants and Chair with all the relevant details, as indicated above. Please note that each roundtable should run either entirely in English or entirely in Spanish/Portuguese, which may be combined. Roundtables may not combine English with any other language. Please indicate the language(s) of the panel.

The deadline for submission of proposals is December 15th, 2021.

Proposal acceptance/rejection notifications will be communicated by email by February 1st, 2022.

This new Call for Papers comes to update and complement the existing Program of the original 2020 Conference.


Prof. Arie M. Kacowicz, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, Program Chair

Dr. Andrea Oelsner, Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina, Program Chair


 List of Sections for the Sixth Global International Studies Conference

Section Chairs

Dr. Daniel Blinder
National University of San Martín, Argentina
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Dr. Maximiliano Vila Seoane
CONICET and National University of San Martín, Argentina
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Languages

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Science and Technology (S&T) play an increasingly important role in contemporary theoretical and policy debates on global politics. The multiplication of innovations with the potential to alter the international order have increased in the past few years. Artificial intelligence, biotechnologies, cyber weapons, and drones, among others, are just examples of how S&T pose new threats and opportunities to states, non-state actors, and individuals in world politics. It is true that the interest of International Studies in technology is not new; for example, the implications of nuclear or space technologies on international security have been examined for decades. However, the acceleration of potential political disruption driven by S&T requires new empirical studies and new theoretical frameworks to understand and act upon these global challenges. In this line, the panels in this section will discuss the nexus among international security, development, and different types of technologies, both new ones, such as artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, 5g, nanotechnologies, and more established ones, such as biotechnologies, nuclear technologies, and space technologies.

Section Chairs

Prof. Miriam Gomes Saraiva
Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil
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Prof. Camilo López Burián
University of the Republic of Uruguay, Uruguay
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

The studies on the interaction between politics, democracy, and foreign policy in Latin America have developed during the past three decades, since the democratization process that took place in many Latin American countries in the 1980s. Currently, some countries of the region are experiencing the expansion of right-wing governments with nationalistic features, within the framework of formal democratic regimes. In order to understand this phenomenon, the section proposes to examine the links between democracy, ideology, and foreign policy along several dimensions: the impact of democratization in the foreign policymaking; traditional versus new practices and actors in foreign policy; the role of the political parties; the inclusion of foreign policy issues in the domestic political debate; political preferences; and the effects of political changes upon foreign policy. The ideas of continuity and change in foreign policy can be linked to different factors, including structural and external levels of analysis. Thus, the main goal of this section is to rethink the way to analyze and explain changes and continuities in foreign policy, as well as the political impact on them, by identifying and comparing different features, political preferences, and changes in the foreign policy of several Latin American states, with a particular focus upon domestic political factors since the 2000s.

Section Chair

Dr. Evgenii Gamerman
Financial University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Blagoveshchensk branch, Russia
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Marcin Grabowski
Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland
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Language

English

Abstract

This section will address the Asian regional order. It welcomes papers and panels dealing with all of Asia’s subregions, though special focus will be on the Northeast Asian region. This region is unique in its features. First, it has two of the three leading global economies, China and Japan. Secondly, the region has a large number of territorial disputes among the neighboring countries, and one of the highest levels of conflict in the world.

Nonetheless, the section will consider contemporary security threats in the whole Asian region. These are both traditional, military threats to security, such as North Korea’s nuclear program, and the regional arms race. In addition, the section will examine non-military threats to security, including environmental issues in China, the Russian Far East, Mongolia, and Taiwan, as well as migration issues, the activities of transnational criminal groups, and energy security.

As the 21st Century has been called the Pacific Century, we have not only faced sectoral changes in the region, but also a gradual redefinition of the regional system as a whole. Those changes have been caused by the changing position of certain units in the system, including both nation-states and non-state actors: a strong, but relatively diminishing position of the United States, the failing role of Japan, the increasing position of the People’s Republic of China, the growing regional role of India, regional actors (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations), regional coalitions (e.g., quadrennial cooperation of Australia, India, Japan, and the United States), or sub- and trans-national actors. Those changes are also visible in the evolving name of the region, including Asia, Asia-Pacific, the Pacific Basin, or the most current Indo-Pacific one, somehow envisaging the aforementioned changing positions of different units of the system.

This section aims to explain the changing dynamics of the Indo-Pacific region, including the role of great, regional, and middle powers in shaping the Indo-Pacific system, as well as to offer sectoral analysis on political, military, economic, social, and cultural challenges in the region. Regional integration, both institutionalized (APEC, ASEAN, TPP, RCEP, SAARC, etc.) and non-institutionalized, will be debated in the section. We invite scholars interested in the theoretical and empirical analysis of the region to submit proposals.

Section Chairs

Dr. Leslie Wehner
University of Bath, United Kingdom
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Prof. Cameron G. Thies
Arizona State University, United States
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

This section seeks to study and analyze the links between populism and foreign policy. We invite the submission of papers that address this link, given the rise to power of populist leaders like Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, Jair Bolsonaro, and others across the rest of Europe, Latin America, South East Asia, and the developing world, who question cosmopolitan ideas and norms that proliferated alongside regional integration and globalization in the 1990s. Populism is certainly not a new phenomenon, especially in Latin America, and there a diversity of political ideologies and types of populist leaderships around the world. However, only recently have scholars started to pay attention to the nexus of populism and foreign policy. This section will offer an intellectual space to study and present results on this nexus and thus will prioritize papers and panels that: 1) explore this link from a theoretical perspective and offer conceptual innovations. What type of theories can capture this link and is the domestic conceptual study of populism enough to understand how populism works regarding foreign policy?; 2) This section also seeks papers that discuss and offer new ways to study populism in foreign policy from a methodological perspective. How can we study populism? What kind of methodological tools are appropriate to study this nexus?; 3) This section will also prioritize papers that bring empirical cases from both the Global North and the Global South as single case-studies or using intra-regional and cross-regional comparisons.

Section Chairs

Prof. Rut Diamint
Torcuato DiTella University, Argentina
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Carina Solmirano
Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina
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Language

English

Abstract

Contemporary debates on defense and international security are still strongly influenced by mainstream IR theories, such as realism and neo-realism, and by those theories that have encouraged a ‘broadening and deepening’ in the field of security studies. The post-9/11 security environment brought a new interest in the study and analysis of non-traditional security threats and the ways in which states and organizations respond to them. In this new context, it is inevitable to refer to the role of the armed forces and whether they should be adapted to cope with these non-traditional threats or continue fulfilling their traditional roles. Similarly, themes related to new forms of conflict, the role of technology in international security, and the importance of regional security arrangements as a response to a changing international environment are increasingly receiving more attention from the academic community.

Section Chairs

Dr. María Florencia Rubiolo
CONICET and Córdoba Catholic University, Argentina
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Prof. Jorge M. Vega
Del Salvador University, Argentina
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Global order is in a state of transition and uncertainty, marked by a complex geo-economic and geopolitical reordering. Multidimensional dynamics such as China’s rising as a global power and its dispute with the United States, and the fourth industrial revolution, pose new dilemmas to Latin America and demand adaptive responses. Latin American countries confront external constraints that, besides being regional, impact in different ways throughout the regional societies. National interests associated with different development models and the frequent shifts on domestic political orientations generate multiple arenas of dissent and convergence. In this section, we will address the different problems that affect Latin American countries in this context. The topics will include: economic diplomacy and integration mechanisms; challenges of climate change and the role of global governance; emerging Asian economies and their impact upon Latin America’s economic and diplomatic strategies; the new agendas related to migration, gender, and human rights and the 2030 agenda; and defense and security policies. This multidisciplinary perspective attempts to articulate complementary views in order to develop a comprehensive analysis of Latin American politics in a world order in transition.

Section Chair

Dr. Olga Vladimirovna Zalesskaia
Blagoveshchensk State Pedagogical University, Russia
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Language

English

Abstract

The current geopolitical situation is characterized by increased migration flows. It can be argued that this process has become global. Today, 258 million people in the world are migrants; that is, they do not live and work in their native country. This reality requires new legal frameworks, relevant laws, and new regulations.

For example, on December 11, 2018, in Morocco, representatives of 164 states approved the United Nations “Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration,” designed to optimize the status quo and declared an “integrated approach to optimize the overall benefits of migration while eliminating risks and problems for individuals and communities in countries of origin, transit, and destination.” This treaty imposes certain obligations on the protection of the rights of migrants to the receiving parties, whereas donor countries are less bound by any obligations. In any case, the signing of such an international treaty implies a restriction of national sovereignty, regarding the control over the national borders. Yet, our world is still a world of national states, whereas national state interests remain the focus of international relations, leading at times to the exacerbation of international tensions and conflicts.

We invite proposals related to migration and the international legal order, the need for multilateral cooperation, issues of global governance and international migration, and the tensions between the international order of states and the phenomenon of international migration.

Section Chair

Dr. George Shambaugh
Georgetown University, United States
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Julieta Zelicovich
Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentina
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Language

English

Abstract

The relationship between economics and politics in the Global South has been buffeted by multiple dynamic forces. Ongoing battles among national politicians, central bankers, and finance ministers over the content and trajectory of national economic policies continue to create policy uncertainties that make investors skittish and capital scarce. Inequities generated by economic crises and post-crisis recoveries have diminished popular trust in neoliberal ideas and led to a resurgence of populism. Strategies of privatizing and subsequently renationalizing public services are being replaced with the use of public-private partnerships to address political and market failures. Finally, environmental degradation, climate change, overfishing, and deforestation are transforming traditional economic livelihoods and motivating unsustainable and illicit behaviors. In this context, the experiences of Argentina and other countries in the Global South provide unique insights into the political economy of these issues. Papers and panels in this section are then expected to address theoretical debates and/or policy issues associated with these and other related areas.

Section Chairs

Dr. Diana Tussie
Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), Argentina
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Dr. Pablo Nemiña
FLACSO and National University of San Martín, Argentina
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

This section aims to be a call for IR scholars to engage with International Political Economy issues, opening up to new research agendas while at the same time retrieving some of the core concepts of IPE in order to understand the global transformations in progress.

In line with the core contributions that the IPE field has brought to scholarly debates – the ‘opening-up’ of IR traditional concerns – this section aims to discuss and present dilemmas regarding international trade, finance aid, development, the competition for infrastructure, natural resources, land-grabbing, health, and climate change politics, from an interdisciplinary approach.

We also promote the debate on pre-existing and recently-created international financial institutions, as well as the foundation of new development banks. The role of regions is central as well, in our aim to think about present and future scenarios, especially if we are determined to understand the relationship between development processes, the global context, and the opportunity structures. In this context, the debate on emerging powers opens a new set of questions. Many see the emerging 21st ‘Asian century’ as having an impact upon the reconfiguration of the Global South as it confronts new dilemmas and a new set of opportunity structures. Therefore, this section is a call to analyze the complex and reciprocal on-going transitions at multiple levels, from an IPR perspective and through manifold epistemologies. We thus encourage the submission of papers on the global transformations, regional reconfigurations, and national dilemmas.

Section Chairs

Prof. Jochen Kleinschmidt
Universidad del Rosario, Colombia
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Prof. Ralf J. Leiteritz
Universidad del Rosario, Colombia
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

Questions related to the sociology of knowledge figure prominently within the emerging field of Global IR. Posed in opposition to the dominant concepts, actors, debates, and discourses in the Global North, Global IR contains the promise to transform International Relations into a more pluralistic and empirically grounded discipline. This section seeks to open up the uniform black box of the Global South into its constitutive parts – both in a geographic and sociological sense. In other words, we invite panel and paper proposals that speak to the diversity of theoretical and empirical approaches in different parts of the Global South; thus, highlighting how they define their object of study, theoretical approach, or research methodology within the specific geo-political, -economic, and -cultural context in which scholars are located. Our aim is to probe the ontological, epistemological, and methodological variety that allegedly characterizes Global IR. Presenters are therefore especially invited to reflect on the everyday or life-world sources of their scholarly contributions.

Section Chairs

Prof. Dan Miodownik
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
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Vanessa Matijascic
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

As a scientific discipline, the field of Conflict and Peace Studies has a history that goes back to the 1950s. Informed by an explicit normative orientation towards non-violence and the peaceful organization of social relations, this field highlights that peace is an academic subject to be studied on its own merits. In the 21st century, the challenges for the pursuit of peace are still enormous and they deserve careful attention. This section proposes to discuss problems and challenges in the field of Conflict and Peace Studies in the coming years, with a particular focus on themes related to Political Science and International Relations, such as civil wars, intrastate conflicts, humanitarian interventions, stabilization missions, peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations, gender-mainstreaming and peaceful building, local approaches to building sustainable peace, and Latin America’s role in the field of conflict and peace studies. Therefore, we invite potential participants to submit proposals aiming to contribute to these ongoing debates.
The section invites proposals for organized panels in either English, Spanish, or Portuguese, and individual paper proposals in the respective languages on topics involving the study of peace and conflict processes and dynamics. The section’s intention is to broaden cooperation and intellectual dialogue amongst peace and conflict scholars, to encourage a fruitful interaction with the worldwide peace and conflict scientists, and to bring together the most updated and relevant research on conflict and peace-related topics from throughout the entire world.

Section Chair

Dr. Tian-jia Dong
Westfield State University, United States
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Najimdeen Ayoola Bakare
NUST University, Pakistan
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Language

English

Abstract

Amid the global tide of nationalist and populist fever, national borders have become so salient that we easily overlook the cross-border webs, ties that are from interpersonal to inter-organizational/inter-grouping to international. We further regard the world as an anarchy because we believe the boundaries between nation-states remain impenetrable. Realism focuses on national interests and the hard/soft power to gain them, whereas Idealism addresses issues of humanity without the real power to resolve any of them. Therefore, both Realism and Idealism are less satisfactory in providing a theoretically sound and practically sensible vision of world order, as well as effective solutions to conflicts among nation-states. However, cross-border webs are real and live. More significantly, an interdependent global governing power has emerged, without leading to a world government. This section invites paper and panel proposals addressing the following questions: Are there global webs that effectively link active power agents across national borders? Is it possible that these webs evolve into a global governance system beyond the Realist and Idealist visions of world order? Can the examination of these global webs enable us to develop new theoretical approaches beyond the Realism-Idealism duality? Is there a new type of power beyond hard and soft power that might empower these global webs? We invite the submission of proposals addressing network theory, neo-institutionalism, post-modern constructionism as all possible theoretical paths, along empirical research necessary for a solid foundation of these theoretical constructions.

Considered as the harbinger of economic prosperity and the process of flattening the un-flat world, contemporary globalization is received differently across the world. As a phenomenal agent and process, influencing global behavior, identity, and institutions, globalization generates multiple outcomes and raises many questions, rejuvenates old narratives and grievances, and causes the confluence of domestic, regional, and global actors, either as supporters or opponents of the world order. To this end, what do we know about the possible impacts of globalization at the micro and macro levels? And how have scholars from different parts of the world confronting diverse realities approached globalization?

In this context, the effects of globalization may be assessed at different levels. At the micro level, it is imperative to investigate the intersection of globalization and the new forms of political mobilization and political violence. At the macro level, we need to examine the observable implications of globalization; i.e., on the erosion and redistribution of state power, global governance, global economy, military expenditures, environmental issues, and international ethics. Paper and panel proposals can encompass domestic, intra-regional, inter-regional, and global studies.

Paper and panel proposals should focus on theoretically-grounded and empirically driven studies that investigate how globalization functions formally and informally as a stimulus of change. For instance, how globalization engenders the growing waves of popular political mobilization and the new forms of nationalism and populism across the world? How do we gauge between the aspirations and realities of globalization vis-à-vis its claim(s) of producing a flattened world? Is globalization intrinsically contradictory, and hence the call for alternative and more inclusive world orders?

Section Chair

Dr. Nicolas Terradas
Florida International University, United States
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Latin America is a region of contrasts and challenges within International Relations. Theoretically, it is commonly considered as an ‘anomaly’, or a virtual ‘laboratory’ of ideas, given that most traditional IR theories cannot easily account for the particular history and evolution of the region. Historically, Latin America’s role in world politics has also been contrasted with its rather uncomfortable role as the proverbial ‘backyard’ of the United States, as well as an embryonic and dependent interaction with the wider international system. In this context, the present section tries to bring together contributions from within and without the region in an attempt to capture some of this complexity in Latin America’s place in the study of International Relations. With this in mind, this section organizes a set of panels and roundtables that focus on comparative, historical, and global perspectives regarding Latin America. It welcomes contributions in English, Spanish, and Portuguese from scholars and advanced students from all backgrounds and specializations. Preference is given, however, to contributions addressing Latin America’s historic and/or contemporary security dynamics, as well as economic development, multilateral organizations and institutions, and U.S.-Latin American relations.

Section Chair

Mariel R. Lucero
CERIMA, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo
Universidad Champagnat, Argentina
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Compared to other disciplines, feminist perspectives arrived rather late in International Relations. They focus on making visible international political phenomena that have kept women and non-binary gender hidden. From the 1990s, they have contributed to developing other theories, such as queer studies and new masculinities, within the discipline. These perspectives have allowed us to show the relevance of inequity, discrimination, and subalternity of women and non-binary gender subordination at the international level. In this way, these theories reveal the diffused frontiers between international, state, and individual level, and between public and private spheres. In this sense, the rise of feminist and gender perspectives in these years is superimposed on the international expansion of women’s presence. Conversely, these perspectives have questioned economic, symbolic, and institutional structural gendered violence in the academic and political agenda as we have never seen before. These topics have been problematized by our discipline. They question theories, methodologies, and traditional practices extending the scope of policy and politics. In this context, the section proposes the discussion and revision of different political international issues, bringing feminist, gender, and queer studies perspectives into International Relations, allowing to reinterpret the reality from alternative theoretical, methodological, and empirical lenses. In sum, we invite scholars to address the challenges of answering questions and showing how and why these alternative approaches break into the field of our discipline, and what the contribution of a feminist, gender or queer perspective is towards filling the vacuum and deficiencies of traditional international studies.

Section Chair

Prof. Amichai Magen
IDC Herzliya, Israel
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Language

English

Abstract

This section seeks to explore the nexus between governance (including limited statehood, non-state governors, rebel governance, and competition over order at the local, sub-state, state, regional, and global levels) and political violence (including war, hybrid warfare, civil wars, internationalized civil wars, and terrorism). Proposed panels and/or individual papers may address conceptual, historical, empirical, or methodological puzzles related to the governance-political violence nexus. In particular, scholars are invited to submit proposals pertaining to the following themes: (1) contemporary and emerging patterns of political violence; (2) causes of governance breakdowns and the onset of violent conflict; (3) rebel governance and the relationship between states, non-state armed groups, material resources, and societies; (4) order and order contestation (pre-violent and violent competition over territory, legitimacy, and the provision of public goods) at the local, national, regional, and global levels; (5) institutions, rules, and policies for managing the governance-political violence nexus (local, national, regional, and global); and (6) the impact of digital age technologies upon the governance-political violence nexus.

Section Chairs

Jakob Landwehr
Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany
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Alexandra Paulus
Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany
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Language

English and Portuguese

Abstract

International security has so far not figured prominently in governance research (Krahmann 2003 and Kacowicz & Press-Barnathan 2016 being notable exceptions). Instead, debates on mechanisms of coordination and cooperation beyond the nation-state (Ansell & Torfing 2016) have predominantly focused on the European Union’s multi-level governance (Schakel, Hooghe & Marks 2015) or the governance of common public goods like climate policy (Kuyper, Linnér & Schroeder 2017).

This gap is surprising because emerging security challenges fundamentally change or question the ability of the nation-state to formulate and implement effective policy responses. One example is the nation-state’s so far limited ability to address cybersecurity challenges through the construction of norms or cyber arms control (Maness & Valeriano 2015). Therefore, this section aims to explore the role of the nation-state vis-à-vis other actors, institutions, and instruments of global governance in addressing emerging security challenges.

We invite qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods data-driven research, as well as theoretical reflections. Potential emerging security challenges to be addressed regarding the role of the nation-state include climate change, emerging technologies, migration, public health, sustainable development, and transnational terrorism and violent radicalization. Contributions could analyze the role of the nation-state in addressing these emerging security challenges regarding the relationship with non-state actors like the private sector, civil society, and proxies, and how multilateral global governance institutions or instruments of global governance like norms shape the nation-state’s scope of action.

Section Chairs

Dr. Ori Preuss
Tel-Aviv University, Israel
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Dr. Juan Pablo Scarfi
National University of San Martín, Argentina
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

An intimate relationship between diplomacy and intellectual life has been a dominant feature of modern Latin America, where men and women of letters, academics, and legal experts played a prominent role in the elaboration and execution of, and reflection on, the foreign policy of their individual countries, as well as the continent as a whole. In fact, one can claim for a tradition of the ‘diplomat-intellectual—who was linked interactively to the sphere of foreign policy due to their very training and experience in literature, journalism, law or the social sciences—a link that formed part of a general symbiosis between writing and governing in nineteenth century Latin America. While the advance of modernity brought about professionalization of intellectual activities, thereby contributing to an incipient separation between the state and written culture, the relationship between the two remained strong, and in what concerns diplomacy, it even intensified. However, this interrelationship remains a relatively neglected aspect of Latin American diplomatic history, an area of study still largely dominated by traditional approaches. The latter have moved along a separate path not only from cultural history broadly conceived, but also from closer fields such as literary studies, intellectual history, and the history of ideas. This section aims to integrate these departing paths. Proposals may focus on individual careers, formal and informal networks, cultural-political projects, key texts, among other topics. The section focuses upon international relations within Latin America, though unusually interesting proposals about the relations between Latin America and other parts of the world will be considered too.

Section Chair

Prof. Andrés Serbin
CRIES, Argentina
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Andrei Serbin Point
CRIES, Argentina
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Language

English

Abstract

The existing links and relations between different regions of the world are changing considerably, both in political and economic spheres. The de-globalization context is one of the factors in such shifts. The reconfiguration of balance of forces within Latin America, as well as the integration (and dis-integration) processes in the continent have become one of the motives for searching for new partnerships throughout the world. At the same time, some extra-hemispheric actors such as China, Russia, Turkey, Iran, and India are also focusing upon Latin America in search of economic resources, new markets, and/or geopolitical partnership and presence. The region has become a place of rivalry and competition not only between the United States and China, but also between Russia and the United States, Russia and China, and new emerging regional powers like India, Turkey, and Iran, which are also entering the game. In addition, one should not forget about the role played by the European Union (especially since the free trade treaty signed between the EU and Mercosur), and the Eurasian continent as a whole. BRICS is another actor in this complicated geopolitical and geo-economic game within the framework of the international relations in Latin America. In this context, we welcome contributions that address the different global, regional, and security links.

Section Chair

Dr. Francine Rossone de Paula
Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom
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Language

English

Abstract

The division of the world into sovereign political communities is taken as a given in most representations and interpretations of ‘inter-national’ politics. John Agnew (1994) has referred to the erasure of historical disputes inherent to the creation and maintenance of states as sovereign spaces as an element of a “territorial trap.” Besides defining the boundaries between the domestic and the international, these sovereign spaces became containers of ‘society.’ As Ó Tuathail (1996) reminds us, the way territories are mapped, organized, categorized and invited into the political imaginary is the result of power-knowledge relations. This section is an invitation to remap international politics. It is an effort to expose the power-knowledge nexus in ongoing and often decentralized practices of ‘geo-graphing’, or, in other words, of inscribing meaning on the global geopolitical map. This section seeks to shed some light on the structures operating in the demarcation and hierarchization of socio-political life and in the various forms of violent exclusion in practices of ‘bordering.’ The participants in this section are encouraged to challenge traditional geographical/cartographic imaginaries. By challenging borders as defining the conditions and spaces for political agency, for knowledge, and for relations or movements that have been authorized (or condemned) in global politics, this conversation should potentially lead to the articulation of alternative spatio-temporal imaginaries, freeing up the space for the intelligibility of different movements and trajectories, what could hopefully result in the recognition of some of the multiple spatialities and temporalities that have been wiped out of our maps.

Section Chairs

Dr. Rafael Velazquez
University of Baja California, Mexico
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Dr. Alejandro Simonoff
National University of La Plata, Argentina
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

The section will discuss Latin American foreign policies under new administrations in several countries of the region. The countries to be considered are Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Chile. The goal of the section is to define some discussion points and patterns, as referred to the elements that determine the foreign policy decision-making process of these countries. We invite scholars interested in decision-making processes in relation to the recent foreign policies of the above-mentioned countries, as well as regime change and foreign policy in the region, and U.S. foreign policy towards these countries to submit paper proposals.

Section Chairs

Juliana Manzoni Cavalcanti
Brazil
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Sol Mora
Universidad de San Martin, Argentina
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

The so-called era of the Anthropocene represents a new geological era characterized by the global impact of human activity upon ecosystems. This raises important questions about the future of life on planet Earth and about the socio-productive, ecological, and political transformations associated with these changes. Understanding the meaning and reach of these transformations constitutes an enormous socio-political challenge of global scale. The aim of this section is to explore the contributions and limitations of International Relations approaches to understanding the global ecological crisis in an Anthropocene context. Some of the questions to be addressed in the panels include: 1) What is the nature of the ‘political’ and power dimensions in the era of the Anthropocene?; 2) What does it mean to incorporate inter- and transdisciplinarity into international studies?; 3) How does the discipline of IR understand state-society-nature relations?; 4) What are the specific contributions that IR perspectives make to understand the global ecological crises?; and 5) Which questions and/or debates arise when approaching the environmental problematique from the IR discipline?

Understanding health as a broader condition – not limited to an organic disturbance of physical body – has been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) for over forty years. In view of a global crisis in supporting Primary Health Care (PHC) systems, in October 2018 the WHO prompted a new meeting to commemorate the 1978 Alma-Ata Declaration on PHC. The newly Astana Declaration reinforced the political commitment from national governments to PHC and analyze the ongoing challenges faced by this health strategy. The recent rise of conservative and authoritarian governments in countries like the United States and Brazil, and a series of reactionary movements like Brexit, have contributed to weaken the systems of universal health coverage. Funding health politics that strengthen the securitization of global health is also a current trend, which is seen as a process of co-production of a new world order based on multiple non-state actors, the resurgence of right-wing governments and neo-fascist movements, climate change, and the reemergence of diseases. In order to analyze the new meanings of global health, we encourage students and scholars to contribute to this section with research on the history of global health processes, which might include the analysis of replacing of ‘international’ by ‘global’ health, as well as studies that focus on the role of varied actors regarding the subject matter. In addition, we welcome proposals as related to the current Covid-19 crisis.

Section Chairs

Christian E. Rieck
University of Potsdam, Germany
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Dr. André Härtel
National University of Kyiv – Mohyla Academy, Ukraine
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Unlike regional powers, small states remain understudied in the literatures on foreign policy, regionalism, and global governance. We believe small states to be necessary, even indispensable, actors as they provide constructive followership for larger states in regional and global multilateral fora. Yet, small states can also serve as mediators, ‘lighthouses’ and norm entrepreneurs with high levels of agenda setting and convening power – and only rarely as detached powers. This depends on the structure and dynamics of the regional order, but even in less constructive settings as the EU small states tend to have surprising levels of freedom that translate into outsized power in international diplomacy. Thus, we argue that small states are ideal stakeholders of multilateralism. Small states are placed precariously between regional powers with distinct regional and global interests, on the one hand, and secondary states on the other, usually engaged in some form of competition with them in multilateral settings. Lacking the resources to resolve regional and global problems alone, small states’ foreign policy identity is usually ‘constructivist’ – to tame the unilateralist tendencies of larger powers, and to socialize them into a more benign culture of cooperation. The main goal of this section is to come up with a typology of foreign policy behavior of small states, their resources, instruments, and domestic sources – as well as regional context factors and the dynamics of multilateral fora that might act as intervening variables. We welcome qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods data driven research as well as theoretical reflections, both within the same issue area as well as cross-issue comparisons, as related to small states.

Section Chairs

Dr. Erica Simone Almeida Resende
Brazilian War College in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Dr. Paula Sandrini
Pontifical Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

Recent investigations in social theory have pointed out that feeling, forgetting, and remembering constitute political acts, since they help us to construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct meanings, identities, interests, and orders, especially in contexts of political transition. At the same time, studies about the role of memory and trauma have opened up new ways of understanding political processes of construction of subjectivity, following moments of crisis and rupture when authority breaks down. This section engages in the discussion of how emotions and affect may function as social practices for (re-)constructing realities, identities, interests, and orders in world politics. Balancing theoretical, epistemological, ontological, and methodological enquiries, this section invites scholars to reflect on the social, political, cultural, discursive, and psychological dimensions of practices to overcome crises, remake authority, and produce social change, especially in context of transitioning states, peace-building processes, pacification processes, transitional justice, and the remaking of political order following crises.

Section Chairs

Dr. Flavia Guerra Cavalcanti
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Pablo Victor Fontes
Pontifical Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

This section proposes several panels and a roundtable on the subject of how international migration is reshaping and rearticulating the traditional norms about the state, territory, and citizenship (in terms of identity and differences) in a global scale, and how the figures of refugees and migrants contribute to our understanding of political agency and action in the 21st century. Papers about the notions of refugee camps and their interactions with humanitarian aid are welcomed in our section, as well as studies regarding the relationship between migration and other themes of IR theory, such as (in) security, surveillance, intervention, environmental degradation, health, gender, racism, ‘failed states’, and others. We will also accept proposals aimed at analyzing the (de)securitization of migration in democratic and populist regimes. In this context, we will examine the question: Which discourses and representations of the migrants and the refugees (in terms of aesthetics and media studies), have been used by fascist and far-right movements and governments all over the world? Could we agree with Bruno Latour (2019), that the refugee and migrant question is the ethical question of our time? In sum, this section seeks through inter-transdisciplinary works, theoretical and methodological combined approaches, such as international political sociology, to reflect upon the transformations (continuities and discontinuities) of migrations (and their studies) nowadays, considering information and communication technologies and their interactions with multiple policies of (dis)mobility, boundaries, and resistance, according to a global-local interface.

Section Chair

Dr. José Briceño-Ruiz
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Mexico
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

The aim of this section is to analyze the interactions between globalization, regionalism, and nationalism in the current era. The narrative of globalization as an inevitable process that would lead to a ‘world neighborhood’ is being challenged nowadays by the (re-)emergence of nationalism, both in the developed and underdeveloped/developing countries. As a result, some regional initiatives that were linked to globalization, such as the TPP or the EU, have weakened. Moreover, some regional processes are now in crisis, particularly in Latin America. Similarly, foreign policies have been redesigned in the context of a changing global scenario. This has also theoretical implications that led to challenges of the traditional views of globalization and regionalism. We welcome contributions about these changing dynamics of world politics, and the complex links among globalization, nationalism, and regionalism.

Section Chairs

Dr. Ariel Gonzalez Levaggi
Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina, Argentina
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Prof. Victor Jeifets
Saint Petrsburg State University, Russia
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Dr. Emilian Kavalski
University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

The research on regional orders has been critical to understanding regional and global developments, in addition to providing important contributions to the IR discipline. This section presents theoretical and empirical discussions regarding the concept of regional orders, comparative studies on regional orders, and empirical analysis of several non-Western and/or Global South cases. IR scholarship on regional orders usually focuses upon major regional developments by using concepts and ideas attached to diplomatic and security affairs. The literature on regional orders provides a series of distinctive tools to analyze regional patterns addressing critical issues such as the role of local and global actors, the military intervention of extra-regional powers, and the interaction between large and medium powers in hierarchical regional orders, among other issues. As the lead theme of the 6th Global International Studies Conference looks to diversify the “multiple voices and alternative orders” around the globe, the section aims to discuss multiple approaches, dimensions, and cases of regional frameworks.

The section welcomes papers on topics related to various interpretations of regional orders, as well as papers exploring the security and non-security agenda in the development of regional settings.

Section Chairs

Dr. Danilo Marcondes de Souza Neto
Brazilian War College, Brazil
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Dr. Maíra Siman
Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Language

English, Spanish, and Portuguese

Abstract

This section welcomes contributions addressing the different aspects of civil-military relations, especially those that seek to discuss the contemporary changes, challenges, and limitations of these interactions in democratic settings, as well as those of armed conflicts and political crises. The section takes into consideration that civil-military relations have different characteristics within the Global North and within the Global South. They are also influenced by specific dynamics within different regions of the world, as well as by patterns of colonization/decolonization and transitions from authoritarian to democratic regimes.

The section considers civil-military relations as an area of academic studies and interdisciplinary practices. We look forward to discussions that include, but are not limited, to the following topics: 1) the broadening of the traditional engagement of military actors; 2) the possibilities and arrangements that define civilian control of the military; 3) national and international expertise and legitimization regarding the engagement of the armed forces in public security; 4) the involvement of members of the armed forces in democratically-elected governments; 5) the role of regional and international organizations in redefining civil-military relations; 6) the impact of participation of the armed forces in peacekeeping operations upon civil-military relations; and 7) civil-military relations in the specific Latin American context.

Section Chairs

Prof. José Antonio Sanahuja
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
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Prof. Roberto Dominguez
Suffolk University, United States
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

Regionalization processes worldwide have provided platforms for discussion of collective problems in international relations. Eventually, such processes have produced common policies and created institutions to manage conflicts and encourage cooperation. While regional organizations have been the cornerstone of regionalism and integration, regionalization as a process entails the convergence of synergies between regional organizations as providers of collective goods, on the one hand, and the regional initiatives of states beyond formal institutional arrangements, on the other. In fact, leaving aside some particular cases, effective regionalism often occurs when multiple actors are willing to collaborate with and beyond formal arrangements. In times of secular stagnation and democracy recession in numerous countries, regional organizations are currently facing increasing obstacles to produce optimal outcomes and outputs. Against this background, this section calls for papers that examine the transformations of regional processes driven by not only regional organizations, but also by groups of states around various policy sectors, from trade to security. In particular, this section encourages theoretical and empirical papers that explore the resilience of regional organizations and states to innovate formulas of collaboration to address regional crises. The resilience and innovation can be unfolded in multiple mechanisms of coordination that include the convergence of regional organizations, bilateral and mini-lateral state arrangements, and collaboration with extra-regional actors (Inter-regionalism). In this regard, based on the individual contributions of the papers, the expected collective outcome of this section is to provide an overview and evaluation of the current state of affairs of regionalism and inter-regionalism as well as the adaptability and innovation of regions to produce or support the production of collective good at the end of the 2010s.

Section Chairs

Prof. Arie M. Kacowicz
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
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Dr. Andrea Oelsner
Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina
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Melisa Deciancio
FLACSO
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Language

English and Spanish

Abstract

The world has become a complicated, complex, and fascinating place, where multiple plays and voices are unfolding. Those voices come not only from the great powers and nation-states, but increasingly from non-state actors and individuals, people at the margin of world politics, silenced voices lost in the cacophony of current events. Consequently, international studies are more than state power and international relations in the traditional sense. With the aim of developing dialogue between students and scholars from different latitudes and hemispheres, we welcome proposals that include theoretical and empirical studies that revisit historical and conceptual assumptions and scenarios about the ‘international’ and about world orders, enrich our understanding of current international affairs, and/or suggest institutional innovations for improving the quality of global public policy.

Section Chairs

Erica Simone Almeida Resende
Brazilian War College, Brazil
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Anna Wróbel
University of Warsaw, Poland
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Language

English

Abstract

This section is dedicated to panels and roundtables willing to reflect on the profession and its current challenges, to encourage the formation of networks for future institutional collaborations, to discuss the possibilities for new pedagogical approaches, to share academic experiences as well as to encourage young scholars to build strategies for their professional careers. This section will embrace innovative formats such as Intergenerational Café, Pay it Forward for Female Scholars and Students, Town Hall Meeting, Mock Trial, Debate, Simulation, Film Screening, Expert/Practitioner Q&A, Performance Art, Audience Participation, Emerging Global South Scholar Workshops, and Junior Scholar Symposia.

Important Dates

  • Deadline for new submission: December 15th, 2021

  • Notification of acceptance: February 1st, 2022